12/7; 6/6; 9/11; 8/9…58,286

dday

The other day a news reporter asked a recent college graduate  “Do you know what Benghazi is all about?”  She replied “Ben Garzi, I think he was in my economics class.”

I ask myself will 9/11 ever become just a day in September and furthermore, I am certain that most young Americans haven’t a clue about the significance of  12/7, 6/6 or 8/9 and 58,286.

The 70th anniversary of D-Day is approaching and I can hear some Americans, if asked what D-Day is about, say … OH is that like dancing with the stars.

Don’t be naive…go ask a young person what happened on December 7 1941  and hear what you get for the answer.

The  following video supports my concerns.  Just click on …

Memorial Day

During World War II, the Battle of Normandy, which lasted from June 1944 to August 1944, resulted in the Allied liberation of Western Europe from Nazi Germany’s control. Codenamed Operation Overlord, the battle began on June 6, 1944, also known as D-Day, when some 156,000 American, British and Canadian forces landed on five beaches along a 50-mile stretch of the heavily fortified coast of France’s Normandy region. The invasion was one of the largest amphibious military assaults in history and required extensive planning. Prior to D-Day, the Allies conducted a large-scale deception campaign designed to mislead the Germans about the intended invasion target. By late August 1944, all of northern France had been liberated, and by the following spring the Allies had defeated the Germans. The Normandy landings have been called the beginning of the end of war in Europe.

The beaches of Normandy are beautiful….until you realize what happen on June 6, 1944 when the waters ran red.

The above picture is void of any emotion because you can’t see faces.  What are these brave men thinking about at this moment?   They can’t see a fucking  thing and don’t have a clue what they’re up against.

beaches-of-normandyThere are 32 sets of brothers buried at the American Cemetery…32…can you image what it was like for the families back in the states…32…I just can’t get over that.

amcem

When we visited, our tour guide talked about the daunting task assigned to the Army Rangers… clime and take control of Pointe du Hoc, which held five large coastal artillery guns.

clifs norm225+ started the 100′  clime and 90 survived. And you ask how long did it take them to get to the top with all hell coming at them every inch of the way up.

pointe_du_hoc_mer_crique

 15 minutes!

The 32 sets of brothers, this clime and the beauty of the Normandy beaches are forever etched in my mind.

The anniversary will be well documented by the media, a few veterans of the battle, that are able, will attend the ceremonies.  The Normans, always thankful will continue to be so while most young Americans will go about their business. 

This day changed the course of a terrible war and that the brave men that landed on those beautiful beaches made sure that today’s young Americans are speaking English not German.

In your travels and if you happen to be in the company of a World War II veteran … thank him/her and if they agree.. sit down and have a chat with them about the War.  I have had that opportunity at my American Legion Post and those that talk, their stories are truly amazing.

 vet tqlk

Remember the old African saying “When an old man dies a library burns to the ground.”

God bless America and may we always stand mighty and strong.

marine mem...and I do hope that these numbers mean something to you 12/7; 6/6; 9/11; 8/9…58,286…

…if you ever get the opportunity to visit Normandy, make sure you thank those poor souls that are buried there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 Responses to 12/7; 6/6; 9/11; 8/9…58,286

  1. Carol says:

    Thank you Dan for this tribute, it made me thank God for what I have. When we visited
    Normandy I was overwhelmed by the number of men that lost their life climbing the unbelievable high cliffs. We as a nation can never thanks them enough. It’s a shame that today’s you people have no idea about their sacrifice

    .

  2. Carol says:

    Thank you Dan for this tribute, it made me thank God for what I have. When we visited
    Normandy I was overwhelmed by the number of men that lost their life climbing the unbelievable high cliffs. We as a nation can never thanks them enough. It’s a shame that today’s you people have no idea about their sacrifice

    .

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