KOS

The haunting torment of memories, not forgotten…where youthful innocence disappears forever …only to prompt a regretted confession that delivers an empty explanation of the curse men at war endure. 

It is my understanding that most combatives that survive war do not talk about what they did and the horrors they witnessed.  The ones that do usually open up to just one person and when all is said the memories continue to torment and the confession regretted. 

Though not public knowledge, KOS meant kill on sight for the British army during the “troubles” in Ireland.  The man that orchestrated the Mountjoy prison helicopter escape and the robbery of art worth of millions of dollars from the Russborough House was designated a KOS target.

I revisit this story because a friend of mine called me after reading “a day to confess” and asked me some pointed questions.  The last two were “what name does he go by and where does he live?”  I paused for what seemed to be a long time and said I don’t think I should tell you… for reasons left unsaid.  I was serious.  Over the years I never thought of the consequences of revealing his identity, but I do now.

I’m sure he would do anything to keep his past buried under time.

After the call, I went online to see if he was on any of the social networks.  It didn’t take me long to find him.  Two pictures jumped out, one with his wife and the other alone.  His smile was warm but his eyes were like ice.  I have no doubt that this wife still doesn’t know his true identity.

For those that haven’t read about him “a day to confess” follows.  It is a true story only the names have been changed. 

Just click on the date it was written and your thoughts and comments are welcome.

A day to confess

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